Meet the Exquisite Quill Authors


Saturday, May 31, 2014

Author Interview: Rosemary Morris



EQ Welcomes Rosemary Morris


Rosemary: First of all, thank you for inviting me to be your guest.

EQ: Welcome to EQ! Tell us a little bit about yourself!

Rosemary: I was born in 1940 in Sidcup, Kent, England. As a child, when I was not making up stories, my head was ‘always in a book.’

While working in a travel agency, I met my Indian husband.  He encouraged me to continue my education at Westminster College.  In 1961 I and my husband, now a barrister, moved to his birthplace, Kenya, where I lived from 1961 until 1982.  After an attempted coup d’├ętat, I and four of my children lived in an ashram in France.

Back in England, I wrote historical fiction and after many rejections from agents and publishers received my first acceptance. I am now proud to say that I am a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association, Historical Novel Society and Watford Writers.

Apart from writing, I enjoy classical Indian literature, reading, visiting places of historical interest, vegetarian cooking, growing organic fruit, herbs and vegetables and creative crafts. 

My bookshelves are so crammed with historical non-fiction which I use to research my novels that if I buy a new book I have to consider getting rid of one.

Time spent with my five children and their families, most of who live near me is precious.


EQ:Tell us a little bit about your most recent release.

Rosemary: While reading non-fiction about the Stuart kings and queens of England, I became interested in the reign of Queen Anne Stuart, daughter of James II, who was forced into exile, and niece of Charles II.

Few mainstream romantic novels are set in Queen Anne’s period, during which trade with the east grew, the Act of Union with Scotland was passed with far reaching consequences  including the present, and the Duke of Marlborough won the war of Spanish Succession thus altering the history of Europe.

I am delighted because three of my novels set in Queen Anne’s reign - 1702-1714 have been published. In each one I have recreated the social customs, food, clothes, houses and much more. As a matter of fact, in the dark of the night, I can almost hear the shelves of my bookcases groan due to the weight of non-fiction books I bought for research.

While reading, I came across a belief that triggered the plot and theme for The Captain and The Countess. Almost immediately, I saw Kate, Countess of Sinclair and Captain Howard, a naval officer on half-pay, in my mind’s eye. I then wrote notes which became the blurb on the back cover of the novel:-

“Why does heart-rending pain lurk in the back of the wealthy Countess of Sinclair’s eyes? 

Captain Howard’s life changes forever from the moment he meets Kate, the intriguing Countess and resolves to banish her pain.

Although the air sizzles when widowed Kate, victim of an abusive marriage meets Edward Howard, a captain in Queen Anne’s navy, she has no intention of ever marrying again.

However, when Kate becomes better acquainted with the Captain she realises he is the only man who understands her grief and can help her to untangle her past.”

EQ: What made you want to become a writer?
Rosemary: Ever since I can remember I have been blessed with an exceptionally vivid imagination and a love of reading and history. The pictures in my mind’s eye grew stronger and stronger. My world was peopled by my powers of invention – by the age of seven everything around me became a fictional character. In my thoughts, the magnificent lime tree at the end of the road was a prince cursed by a wicked witch. In summer, roses on a particular bush were a princess and her ladies-in-waiting. Actually, it’s amazing that I ever reached school on time because there were so many potential stories everywhere I looked, and to this day, I view the world around me differently to most people.

My passion for history, historical fiction and tales set in times past grew. The more I learned and read, the greater my desire to write became. Unfortunately, I encountered many setbacks until, at long last, my novel, Sunday’s Child was published.

EQ: Describe how you create characters.
Rosemary: I have several pages of questions and answers which define my main protagonists in detail. By the time I have completed them I know my characters almost as well as members of my family. I know what they look like, am familiar with their eccentricities, which music and perfume they prefer, where they went to school, who are their parents, grandparents and siblings, and what their horoscopes predict. Only a fraction of the information appears my novels but it helps me to create well-rounded characters with good and bad qualities. It also ensures they are of their time and not 21st century people dressed in costume.

For important minor characters I have a single page of questions and answers which help me to create believable people.

EQ: What is the biggest risk you have taken in writing?
Rosemary: The choice of a period of history that many readers are unfamiliar with is the biggest risk I have taken in writing. For example, when I refer to Queen Anne, it has been assumed I am referring to either Anne Boleyn or Anne of Cleeves – two of Henry VIII’s wives.



Novels by Rosemary Morris

Sunday’s Child. A traditional sweet Regency Romance – e book (Amazon. ASIN:B008B78VXM
False Pretences A traditional sweet Regency Romance – e book (Amazon. ASIN:B008B78VXM
Tangled Love set in the reign of Queen Anne Stuart e book (Amazon.ASIN:B007886ZNI
Far Beyond Rubies set in the reign of Queen Anne Stuart – e book and paperback (Amazon. B00BXHMHZK)
The Captain and The Countess set in the reign of Queen Anne Stuart – e book (Amazon. ASIN: BOOIJH56JQ
Rosemary Morris’s novels are also available from:
https://museituppublishing.com/bookstore, Barnes and Noble – Smashwords – Omnlit – Coffeetime Romance – All Romance and elsewhere.

At the moment I am writing:-
 Monday’s Child the sequel to Sunday’s Child, and Dear Heart set in the reign of Edward II


1 comment:

E. Ayers said...

Oh, Rosemary, I'd love to see those groaning shelves. You've had quite a fascinating life. I'm so happy to know you and to be able to call you a friend.